Tokyo tinned treats

As far as convenient food to go with a cup of coffee is concerned, the Japanese introduction of bread in a can a few years ago seemed to cover all bases, being little, light and long-lasting.

Japanese canned bread

Yet believe it or not even this has been bettered by the arrival of bread, in a can,

Japanese bread vending machine

in a vending machine.

Japanese bread vending machine

Lunch and light snacks may never be the same again.

Update: Now available in a limited edition anime version. Yes, I kid you not.

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Comments

  1. says

    So?

    What do Asians make of mixed vegetable rice in plastic bags sold in the freezer compartments of Western supermarkets to be microwaved later?

    Japanese don’t view bread as the basis for any meal, or even as a side dish. It’s purely an energy fix for grabbing some carbohydrates between meals. Marketing it in the most convenient way possible seems fairly appropriate.

  2. says

    But… can you toast it? How well does it accept Marmite? Or Cheese? Come to think of it, do the Japanese have cheese?

    Tokyo Times, we need a practical experiment, written up, with a photographic record.

  3. Ed says

    “Japanese don’t view bread as the basis for any meal, or even as a side dish. It’s purely an energy fix for grabbing some carbohydrates between meals. Marketing it in the most convenient way possible seems fairly appropriate.”

    Definitely. Maybe I should open one of those Pan-ya in Tokyo, although new competition has arisen..

  4. Keifer says

    CalligraphyKid said, “What do Asians make of mixed vegetable rice in plastic bags sold in the freezer compartments of Western supermarkets to be microwaved later?”

    Good. Point. I would just add… what do some Americans make of it? Personally, I think it’s horrible. I would eat bread from a can before I ate frozen bagged vegetables.

  5. Ricardo Damsel says

    I’ve actually been to Tokyo once and Osaka twice. Ive seen these in Tokyo and I became curious to try one. These are like what you see right now in cafes all over the Western. It’s true that their staples are much more different than ours. We treat other foreign food the same way. Just because its put in a can doesn’t mean it’s not good. These breads are actually very sweet ( favoured in Japan for sweet things ) and they do great! Japan is a highly sophisticated country and they are ingenious. Putting them in a can preserves them for a long time. 370 yen is cheap.

  6. says

    That is amazing, how the Japanese can come up with that. It’s great for Japan because the insane amounts of hours, and energy it takes everyday to get to work, school, and other things. Things like these are great for areas populated like Japan, where catching a train is a hit or miss, and even if you’re in, you’re expected to be tightly packed, and smelly.

  7. Dave says

    bread in a can has been available in the US for a while now…its made for people who actually eat beans on toast with breakfast, and by the way, its disgusting

    at least we dont have it in a vending machine

  8. yarz says

    why is this news? brown bread has been sold in cans since before my mother was a child.

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